8 Days A Week: Beatles' Nights, Funk Nights, Worst Nights

  THURSDAY 23 GIVE RIGHT | If you’re someone in need of a meal today, the soup kitchen team from Wayside Food Programs is offering a free Thanksgiving dinner from noon to 1. | Deering Center Community Church, 4 Brentwood St., Portland | FREE | www.waysidemaine.org FRIDAY 24 PLUCKED FROM REALITY | Sometimes in order to better understand the realities of our world, we need to turn to artifice. Friday and Saturday, the 19th Annual…

Done With Arguing — Colin Quinn chooses comedy over anger in a return to the road

The stand-up comedian Colin Quinn, best known as a Saturday Night Live cast member from 1995 to 2000 (where he was the host of the “Weekend Update” segment), will be bringing his comedy tour “One in Every Crowd” to the Port City Music Hall on November 30.   The Brooklyn-born Quinn returns to the road after a seven-year break in which he focused on writing and performing one-man shows on Broadway, the last two of…

8 Days a Week: Men breaking down, pre-holiday anxieties, and constructive girl talk

THURSDAY 16   REAL BOYS | If there’s one thing men could learn from this cultural moment, it’s that they have a lot of work to do. Earlier this week, the journalist Eve Peysey published a piece titled “How to Apologize, A Guide for Men,” noting that if there’s one thing absent from the rationalizing explanations issued by Louis C.K., Kevin Spacey, Harvey Weinstein (to say nothing of the flat-out disavowals of Alabama GOP candidate…

A handful of memories — Elizabeth Peavey stays connected in one-woman show 'My Mother's Clothes Are Not My Mother'

In what we now think of as the “Mad Men” era, Shirley Peavey was a fashion plate. Shirley’s cocktail gowns and mohair sweaters “advertised her good taste,” explains her daughter, longtime local writer Elizabeth Peavey, and became symbolic — even sacred — in her conception of her mother. And so when Shirley passes away, how can Peavey let these clothes go? Easing her way through her mother’s closet and her own memory, Peavey muses on life, death, grief, and the…

8 Days a Week: Cannabis Fighters, Rap Legends, No Mansplainers

THURSDAY 9 HEAR THIS | Everyone grew up so punk. Bucking the authority of fathers, teachers, priests and blowhards was one of the first things many of us learned to do. It's a defensible move, one I'd do again. But might it have had unintended consequences? One of today's malaises is a pronounced inability to listen to one another. I don't even mean "third way" or "bridge the political divide"-type listening. Just old fashioned hearing…

Movement-building — 'The Twenty' makes an art of resilience from American grief

It's been nearly five years since Sandy Hook, when 20-year-old Adam Lanza fatally shot 20 elementary school children in Newtown, Connecticut, in December of 2012. And while little has shifted the country's desperation about gun violence — including not only mass shootings in national places of public conregation; violence by police on unarmed or otherwise law-abiding people of color; and the steady increase of gun sales and campaign donations from the NRA — a circle of…

Social justice storytelling — Portland writer/mom Kari Wagner-Peck's 'Not Always Happy'

Thorin takes cool Warhol-like photographs of Life Cereal, lays down the law as the fashion police, and is constantly asked by strangers for hugs. He’s also a kid with Down syndrome. The adventure of adopting and raising Thorin is the poignant and refreshingly funny heart of Not Always Happy, a live storytelling performance written and performed by his mom, local writer Kari Wagner-Peck. Her one-woman show runs for one week only as part of the Portland Stage Studio Series, under…

Inspect this! — Good Theater's absorbing mystery classic 'An Inspector Calls'

When Inspector Goole (James Noel Hoban) interrupts a small party at the upper-class Birling home, everyone is certain they have nothing to do with the horrible death he’s investigating. But Inspector Goole has ways of making people talk, and everyone in the Birling home, as it turns out, has something to say, in An Inspector Calls, the British writer’s J. B. Priestley’s classic 1946 mystery. Brian P. Allen directs a taut, stylish, gripping Good Theater production of this much-laureled thriller-cum-social-critique at the St. Lawrence Arts Center.…

Past Transgressions — ICA's 'Confabulations of Millennia' screws with age-old obsessions

Confabulations of Millenia explores the tensions stirred up when contemporary artists utilize visual techniques and motifs from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Curated by the artist Richard Saja, whose Historically Inaccurate series is also featured, the 19 artists in the exhibition all engage with established materials and styles — such as French toile, Rococo porcelain, or classical portraiture — while making fiercely current work. In this process of bending the old to say something…

"There'll Always Be Graffiti" — Portland photographer Nick Gervin makes historic documentation in new book 'The Lines Don't Lie'

This week, Portland photographer Nicholas Gervin releases The Lines Don’t Lie, a sprawling and comprehensive 190-page photography book documenting a generation of Northeastern freight train graffiti art. Inspired by Subway Art, the influential 1984 book by photographer Martha Cooper and Henry Chalfant documenting New York City subway graffiti in the ‘70s and ‘80s, The Lines Don’t Lie is a sui generis piece of New England art documentation. Three-and-a-half years in the making, Gervin's photos in…
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